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11-28-17 Education in the News

NJ Spotlight--Federal Tax Changes Could Hit NJ Municipalities with ‘Double Whammy’

Possible elimination of deduction for state and local taxes has received lots of attention, but ending of tax-exempt status for certain bonds could also hurt New Jersey

As Congress is working to advance an ambitious plan to rewrite the federal tax code, most of the attention in New Jersey has been focused on a proposal to scale back or even eliminate the SALT deduction for state and local taxes. But many communities across the state could also see a big impact from new tax rules that are being proposed for investments in major building projects.

A largely overlooked section of the tax-overhaul legislation the U.S. House of Representatives passed earlier this month calls for an ending of the tax-exempt status of so-called private-activity bonds, which are often used to finance things like hospital facilities, university buildings, affordable housing, and infrastructure projects.

http://www.njspotlight.com/stories/17/11/27/federal-tax-changes-could-hit-nj-municipalities-with-double-whammy/

John Reitmeyer | November 28, 2017

 

Asbury Park Press—Op-Ed--PICCOLELLA: Property tax burden inequitable

The rate of tax growth has slowed during Republican Gov. Chris Christie’s administration -- but half of voters still named New Jersey’s highest-in-the-nation property taxes as their most pressing concern. Bob Jordan

New Jersey apparently believes that real estate taxes are the best way to fund expenses incurred for the common good, such as police, fire, roads and education. With this premise comes the presumption of “tax fairness.” But is New Jersey’s property tax fair? I don’t think so.

http://www.app.com/story/opinion/columnists/2017/11/24/property-taxes-nj-inequitable-frank-piccolella/107982862/

Frank Piccolella Published 12:37 p.m. ET Nov. 24, 2017 | Updated 7:53 a.m. ET Nov. 27, 2017

 

The Atlantic-- Poor Girls Are Leaving Their Brothers Behind

As a college education becomes increasingly important in today’s economy, it’s girls, not boys, who are succeeding in school. For kids from poor families, that can make the difference between social mobility and a lifetime of poverty.

MERCED, California—Nita Vue’s parents, refugees from Laos, wanted all nine of their children go to college. But Nita, now 20, is the only one of her brothers and sisters who is going to get a degree. A few of her sisters began college, and one nearly completed nursing school, she told me. Her brothers were less interested. “The way I grew up, the girls were more into schooling,” she said. “Women tended to have higher expectations than men did.”

This is not unusual. Across socioeconomic classes, women are increasingly enrolling and completing postsecondary education, while, even as opportunities for people without a college education shrink, men’s rates of graduation remain relatively stagnant. In 2015, the most recent year for which data is available, 72.5 percent of females who had recently graduated high school were enrolled in a two-year or four-year college, compared to 65.8 percent of men. That’s a big difference from 1967, when 57 percent of recent male high-school grads were in college, compared to 47.2 percent of women.

https://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2017/11/gender-education-gap/546677/

Alana Semuels| Nov 27, 2017

 


Garden State Coalition of Schools
160 W. State Street, Trenton New Jersey 08608
609-394-2828