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Elisabeth Ginsburg, Executive Director
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5-2-17 Education in the News

Associated Press (via Philadelphia Inquirer)--Hey kids, salt stays and grains go in school meals

LEESBURG, Va. (AP) - Schools won't have to cut more salt from meals just yet and some will be able to serve kids fewer whole grains, under changes to federal nutrition standards announced Monday.

The move by President Donald Trump's Agriculture Department partially rolls back rules championed by former first lady Michelle Obama as part of her healthy eating initiative. Separately, the Food and Drug Administration said on Monday it would delay - for one year - Obama administration rules that will require calorie labels on menus and prepared food displays. The rule was scheduled to go into effect later this week.

As his first major action in office, Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue said the Agriculture Department will delay an upcoming requirement to lower the amount of sodium in meals while continuing to allow waivers for regulations that all grains on the lunch line must be 50 percent whole grain.

http://www.philly.com/philly/education/20170501_ap_81e28e35eeed4fed98c46a49f32044cd.html

MARY CLARE JALONICK, The Associated Press|Updated: May 1, 2017 — 5:36 PM EDT

 

Washington Post--Educators and school psychologists raise alarms about ‘13 Reasons Why’

Educators and school mental health professionals across the country are warning parents about the Netflix series “13 Reasons Why,” saying the show’s graphic depiction of a teenager’s suicide could contribute to a “contagion effect” among students with mental illness and linking it to self-harm and suicide threats among young people.

The show has prompted a major response from educators and administrators, who have spoken at PTA meetings, sent messages home and even cautioned certain groups of students about whether to watch it at all.

“There’s no room for error when it comes to student wellness,” said Rebecca Aguilar, who oversees school counselors at Thoreau Middle School in Fairfax County, Va., where school officials sent home a list of talking points advising parents about the show. She advises parents to “stay engaged with your children. And if they are watching it, process it with them.”

https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/education/educators-and-school-psychologists-raise-alarms-about-13-reasons-why/2017/05/01/bb534ec6-2c2b-11e7-a616-d7c8a68c1a66_story.html?utm_term=.a8f020d572c6

Moriah Balingit May 2 at 7:00 AM

 

The Nation--The Path to HigherEducation With an Intellectual Disability

The number of degree-granting institutions with options for these students is growing.

CLEMSON, South Carolina—Like many college students pestered by nosy relatives, Sydney Davis, a sophomore, is not exactly forthcoming when her boyfriend comes up in conversation. The couple has been together two years, Davis says with the exasperated tone of a young adult clearly trying to change the subject. Davis’s friend, Annsley James, a sophomore wearing a windbreaker with her sorority’s letters on it, sits on the opposite side of the room giggling.

It’s a scene that takes place across college campuses: two friends exchange knowing glances during history lectures, at basketball games, in line at the dining hall. But unlike the majority of young adults pursuing higher education in the United States, James, Davis, and their classmates are doing so with intellectual disabilities.

The women are two students in the ClemsonLIFE program, which offers two- and four-year certificates to young adults with developmental disabilities who may not otherwise have a path to higher education. Students—whose IQs range from the 40s to 70, according to Erica Walters, the program’s coordinator—will hopefully leave the rural, hilly South Carolina campus with the ability to live on their own.

https://www.theatlantic.com/education/archive/2017/05/the-path-to-higher-education-with-an-intellectual-disability/524748/

Hayley Glatter| May 1, 2017

 

Education Week--Budget Deal for 2017 Includes Increases for Title I, Special Education

Federal lawmakers have agreed to relatively small spending increases for Title I programs to districts and for special education, as part of a budget deal covering the rest of fiscal 2017 through the end of September.

Title I spending on disadvantaged students would rise by $100 million up to $15.5 billion from fiscal 2016 to fiscal 2017, along with $450 million in new money that was already slated to be shifted over from the now-defunct School Improvement Grants program. 

And state grants for special education would increase by $90 million up to $12 billion. However, Title II grants for teacher development would be cut by $294 million, down to about $2.1 billion for the rest of fiscal 2017.

The bill would also provide $400 million for the Student Support and Academic Enrichment Grant program, also known as Title IV of the Every Student Succeeds Act. Title IV is a block grant that districts can use for a wide range of programs, including health, safety, arts education, college readiness, and more. 

http://blogs.edweek.org/edweek/campaign-k-12/2017/05/budget_deal_2017_title_I_special_education_spending.html?_ga=2.252539276.487434436.1493724519-503518935.1451996967

Andrew Ujifusa on May 1, 2017 8:40 AM

 


Garden State Coalition of Schools
160 W. State Street, Trenton New Jersey 08608
609-394-2828



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