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3-29-17 Education in the News

Star Ledger--N.J. teachers union aims to oust Sweeney as Senate president

TRENTON -- As its longtime foe, Gov. Chris Christie, prepares to exit the governorship next January, New Jersey's largest teachers union is also pushing to get rid of the state's highest ranking lawmaker, state Senate President Stephen Sweeney, according to a report by the Philadelphia Inquirer. 

The newspaper reported Monday that the New Jersey Education Association is weighing many options to oust Sweeney, a south Jersey Democrat whom the union is criticizing as someone who has frequently collaborated with Christie, a Republican, over the last seven years. 

"We're looking for a new governor and a new Senate president," NJEA president Wendell Steinhauer told the Inquirer.

The union has even launched a website called Change NJ Politics that says by "working with Chris Christie, Sen. Sweeney betrayed our trust and broke his promises."

Sweeney (D-Gloucester) declined comment when reached by NJ Advance Media on Monday.

The lawmaker is up for re-election in November, when all 120 seats of the New Jersey Legislature are on the ballot. 

http://www.nj.com/politics/index.ssf/2017/03/nj_teachers_union_aims_to_oust_sweeney_as_senate_p.html#incart_river_index

Brent Johnson | NJ Advance Media for NJ.com| March 28, 2017 at 9:35 AM

 

 

Associated Press (via ABC News)--Ivanka Trump, Education Secretary DeVos promote STEM careers

Ivanka Trump and Education Secretary Betsy DeVos on Tuesday exhorted young girls to pursue careers in science, technology, engineering and math, saying those fields will provide the jobs and innovation for the future.

Their tour of the National Air and Space Museum with a group of middle school students came as the Trump administration proposed further cuts to education and science, drawing harsh criticism from teachers' unions and others.

Ivanka Trump, a successful entrepreneur who considers herself as a women's rights activist, lamented that women make up 48 percent of America's work force but only 24 percent of STEM professionals.

"This statistic is showing that we are sadly moving in the wrong direction. Women are increasingly underrepresented in important fields of science, technology, engineering and math," Trump said. "But I dare you to beat these statistics and advance the role of women in STEM fields."

http://abcnews.go.com/Lifestyle/wireStory/ivanka-trump-education-secretary-devos-promote-stem-careers-46424553

Maria Danilova, Associated Press| Mar 28, 2017, 4:30 PM ET

 

Education Week-- The Challenge of Creating Schools That 'Work for Everybody'

When the bell rings at Wheaton North High School, a river of white students flows into Advanced Placement classrooms. A trickle of brown and black students joins them. But mostly, the Latino, African-American, and Asian teenagers file into lower-rung classes.

In this way, Wheaton North is like thousands of other high schools across the country, replicating along its polished hallways the inequities that mark the daily lives of minority and low-income students beyond the school's big glass doors. Studies show, in fact, that achievement gaps within schools can be greater than those from school to school.

And, like many schools nationwide, Wheaton North is trying hard to rewire the machinery that perpetuates those inequities. It's making progress, but entrenched patterns persist.

"We're trying to make this school work for everybody," said Matt Biscan, who's in his third year as principal at Wheaton North. "What that means, exactly, we're figuring out as we go."

Educators and the public are aware that achievement gaps often separate students of color from their higher-achieving white peers and leave low-income students lagging behind their better-off peers. Less obvious are the mechanisms and circumstances that contribute to those academic differences—often within a single school.

http://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2017/03/22/the-hard-work-of-creating-schools-for.html

Catherine Gewertz|March 21, 2017


Garden State Coalition of Schools
160 W. State Street, Trenton New Jersey 08608
609-394-2828