Home About GSCS What's New Issues School Funding Coming Up
Quick Links
Meeting Schedule
NJ Legislature
Governor's Office
NJ Department of Education
State Board of Education
GSCS Testimonies
GSCS Data & Charts
Contact Us

Email: gscschools@gmail.com
Phone: 609-394-2828 (office)
             732-618-5755 (cell)

Mailing Address:
Garden State Coalition of Schools
Elisabeth Ginsburg, Executive Director
160 West State Street
Trenton, New Jersey 08608

Search
Twitter

9-26 and 27-13 NJ Students SAT Scores Improving
The Record 9-27-13 New Jersey SAT scores up, but wide racial and economic gaps remain…see breakdown of scores

Star Ledger 9-26-13 N.J. SAT score leaps 10 points; Class of 2013 outpaces national average… New Jersey's average SAT score went up 10 points this year, according to a new report from the College Board

NJSpotlight -By the Numbers 9/27/13: SAT Scores for New Jersey‘s Class of 2013 Up 10 Points…Mean scores climb but results show significant gaps remain across social, ethnic, racial and economic lines

The Record - New Jersey SAT scores up, but wide racial and economic gaps remainsee breakdown of scores

 

Thursday September 26, 2013, 12:07 PM  BY  DAVE SHEINGOLD  STAFF ANALYST

 

Reading

Math

Writing

Total

New Jersey

499

522

500

1521

United States

496

514

488

1498

 

 

 

 

 

Gender

Reading

Math

Writing

Total

Male

502

537

495

1534

Female

496

508

505

1509

 

 

 

 

 

School type

Reading

Math

Writing

Total

Independent private

590

602

595

1787

Religiously affiliated

520

524

523

1567

Public

495

521

496

1512

Other or unknown

442

450

436

1328

 

 

 

 

 

Race and ethnicity

Reading

Math

Writing

Total

White

522

542

523

1587

Black

425

434

420

1279

Asian/Pacific Islander

551

611

565

1727

Native American

459

478

459

1396

Other race

494

517

496

1507

Puerto Rican

446

460

445

1351

Mexican

432

459

428

1319

Other Hispanic

444

468

446

1358

 

 

 

 

 

Family income

Reading

Math

Writing

Total

$0-$20,000

416

441

416

1273

$20,000–$40,000

451

475

449

1375

$40,000–$60,000

471

493

469

1433

$60,000–$80,000

489

508

486

1483

$80,000–$100,000

501

523

500

1524

$100,000–$120,000

513

532

512

1557

$120,000–$140,000

512

536

512

1560

$140,000–$160,000

523

548

526

1597

$160,000–$200,000

535

558

535

1628

More than $200,000

567

593

573

1733

 

 

 

 

 

Intended college major *

 

 

 

 

Top 5

Reading

Math

Writing

Total

Physical sciences

549

587

542

1678

Social sciences

565

555

558

1678

English, literature

571

530

567

1668

Engineering

535

596

532

1663

Biology

541

568

546

1655

Bottom 5

 

 

 

 

Visual and performing arts

497

498

496

1491

Psychology

497

495

497

1489

Education

477

494

484

1455

Engineering technician

467

520

462

1449

Security and protective services

440

460

437

1337

* categories with at least 500 students

 

 

 

 

 

Top 10 intended college destinations

State

Type

Number of applicants

 

Rutgers University

NJ

Public

25,231

 

Montclair State University

NJ

Public

11,046

 

College Of New Jersey

NJ

Public

9,518

 

Rowan University

NJ

Public

8,350

 

William Paterson University

NJ

Public

7,171

 

Drexel University

PA

Private

6,834

 

University Of Delaware

DE

Public

6,493

 

Seton Hall University

NJ

Private

5,887

 

Penn State

PA

Public

5,554

 

Ramapo College

NJ

Public

5,371

 

Richard Stockton College

NJ

Public

5,250

SAT scores for New Jersey high school students ticked upward again this year, the sixth year in a row the state has seen small gains in performance. The total average score of 1,521, combining reading, math and writing tests, is up from 1,499 in 2007. But wide disparities remain between racial and ethnic groups, types of schools and students from different economic backgrounds, according to an analysis by The Record of 2013 SAT scores released by The College Board. Private school students far outpace their public school peers as do Asian-Americans and children from upper-income backgrounds. In addition, boys continue to score better than girls on reading and math tests while girls do better on the writing portion of the SAT exam. The report also includes the major college destinations for graduating seniors, with Rutgers, Montclair State and the College of New Jersey topping the list.

 

Star Ledger -N.J. SAT score leaps 10 points; Class of 2013 outpaces national average… New Jersey's average SAT score went up 10 points this year, according to a new report from the College Board

 

By Star-Ledger Staff Jeanette Rundquist, Kelly Heyboyer  Follow on Twitter 
on September 26, 2013 at 6:06 AM, updated September 26, 2013 at 11:50 AM

 

TRENTON — The average SAT score jumped 10 points for New Jersey students this year, one of the biggest leaps for the state in years on the high-stakes college entrance exam, according to data released early today.

 

In New Jersey, 83,489 members of the Class of 2013 — or 78 percent of graduating seniors — took the SAT, according to the College Board, the nonprofit group that oversees the national test.

New Jersey’s mean score was 499 in critical reading (up 4 points over last year), 522 in math (up 5 points) and 500 in writing (up 1 point), according to the College Board’s report.

In the world of college-readiness testing, yearly increases and decreases of a few points are closely tracked by educators. A double-digit jump in points is considered unusual in a state where a large percentage of students take the SAT.

 

However, nearly 1,400 fewer New Jersey students took the test this year, compared to 2012, which could explain some of the gains, according to the College Board’s report.

Christopher Cerf, the state’s education commissioner, said the state should be proud of the increasing scores.

 

“New Jersey students continue to outperform their peers across the country, and while we still have more work to do to ensure that more of our students are truly college- and career-ready when they graduate, we are proud of what they have accomplished,” Cerf said. “We owe all of our educators a debt of gratitude for their hard work and persistence every day in our classrooms.”

New Jersey’s gains come as the national average remained unchanged. The mean SAT score was 496 in critical reading, 514 in math and 488 in writing, the same as last year.

 

College Board officials said the stagnant national scores are a sign the country needs to do a better job preparing students for college.

 

But critics of high-stakes testing said the scores are another sign that the SAT is losing its relevance. A small but growing number of colleges do not require applicants to take the SAT. The number of students taking the rival ACT college readiness exam is also increasing, said Bob Schaeffer, public education director for the National Center for Fair & Open Testing, a nonprofit advocacy group known as FairTest.

 

“No wonder the new College Board president is scrambling to overhaul his company’s flagship exams,” said Schaeffer, a longtime SAT critic. “The college admissions marketplace is moving away from the SAT.”

 

College Board officials said students, especially minority and low-income students, need to take more rigorous courses, including Advanced Placement classes, to prepare for the SAT and college.

 

“Taking rigorous courses in high school matters. And it matters in college readiness, and ultimately in college success,” said Cyndie Schmieser, the College Board’s chief of assessment. “When students are prepared for college, they are significantly more likely to succeed.”

 

More minority and low-income students are taking the SAT nationwide, according to the report. Nearly 23 percent of the Class of 2013 — or more than 387,000 students — used “fee waivers” to take the $50 SAT for free under a College Board program, a spokeswoman said.

And in an increasing number of districts, students are taking SAT tests for free during the school day, instead of on the usual Saturday morning testing days.

 

In 2010, the College Board began “SAT School Day” as a way to make the tests more accessible to students with part-time jobs or family responsibilities. School districts and states pay the cost of the tests.

 

This year, school-day tests will be offered to students in a handful of districts in New Jersey — Elizabeth, Bloomfield, Jersey City and Bergenfield — as well as to all public school juniors in Delaware and Idaho and to public school juniors and seniors in the District of Columbia.

 

In the Elizabeth School District, the SAT will be a graduation requirement for all students, beginning with the current senior class. Elizabeth will give the test for free during the school day for the first time, which will cost the district $64,000.

 

Like other districts, Elizabeth does not have its most recent SAT scores yet, but officials noted test scores have increased 4 percent in the district in the past six years.

District spokesman Don Goncalves said Elizabeth believes taking the college admission test is crucial.

“We talk about it all the time,” Goncalves said. “We’re preparing them not only their high school diploma, but for post-secondary education.”

 

According to this year’s report, nearly 40 percent of New Jersey students asked that their SAT scores be sent to Rutgers University. The next-highest schools were Montclair State University, the College of New Jersey, Rowan University, William Paterson University, Drexel University and the University of Delaware.

 

NJSpotlight -By the Numbers: SAT Scores for New Jersey‘s Class of 2013 Up 10 Points…Mean scores climb but results show significant gaps remain across social, ethnic, racial and economic lines

John Mooney | September 27, 2013

 

New Jersey students – public and private – saw a 10-point overall increase in their mean SAT scores last year, a notable jump on a test on which overall results usually hardly budge in any given year. The increase in New Jersey’s scores was especially notable in a year in which the national mean scores were mostly unchanged.

But the numbers behind the numbers released by the College Board yesterday tell a host of other stories, too, showing that public schools are making progress but also showing that there wide gaps remain.

New Jersey’s State Profile Report includes interesting findings on such topics as what courses see the smartest kids and what colleges and majors are preferred.

Here are some of the SAT scores and other highlights in (mean scores, where applicable):

·         New Jersey overall: 499 reading; 522 math; 500 writing (US: 496 reading; 514 math; 488 writing)

·         Public schools: 495 reading; 521 math; 496 writing

·         Religious schools: 520 reading; 524 math; 523 writing

·         Independent schools: 590 reading; 602 math; 595 writing

·         Overall male: 502 reading; 537 math; 495 writing

·         Overall female: 496 reading; 508 math; 505 writing

·         Overall participation: 83,485 test-takers (87% public; 10% religious; 3% independent)

·         White: 522 reading; 542 math; 523 writing

·         Hispanic: 522 reading; 542 math; 523 writing

·         Black/African-American: 425 reading; 434 math; 420 writing

·         Asian-American: 551 reading; 611 math; 565 writing

·         Family income under $20,000: 416 reading; 441 math; 416 writing

·         Family income over $200,000: 567 reading; 593 math; 573 writing

·         Average GPA English: 3.36 (out of 4.0)

·         Test-takers studying calculus: 31 percent (574 math score, the highest mean in mathematics)

·         Test-takers studying British literature: 34 percent (517 reading, the highest mean in the language arts)

·         Test-takers studying physics: 60 percent (556 math, the highest mean in the sciences)

·         Test-takers studying European history: 20 percent (533 reading and writing, the highest mean in the social sciences)

·         Test-takers studying Latin: 6 percent (555 reading and 552 writing, the highest mean in the languages)

·         Test-takers studying theater: 11 percent (530 reading, the highest mean in the arts)

·         Top 5 intended majors: Health professions (16%), business/management (13%), engineering (8%), visual/performing arts (9%), biological/biomedical sciences (6%)

·         Top 5 colleges applied (SAT scores sent): Rutgers (39.7 %); Montclair State (17.4%); College of New Jersey (15%); Rowan (13.1%); William Paterson (11.3%)

·         Top 5 Out-of-State Colleges: Drexel (10.8); University of Delware (10.2%); Penn State (8.7); Northeastern (6.9%); NYU (6.8%)

 

 


Garden State Coalition of Schools
160 W. State Street, Trenton New Jersey 08608
609-394-2828