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1-28-14 School Performance Reports Released Today - Provide Lots of Information
The Record - New Jersey releases school performance reports… 'Last year’s debut of the new format brought an outcry from superintendents complaining the lengthy reports contained many errors, but this year there was much less grumbling… Education Commissioner Chris Cerf praised the new reports for offering a wealth of information …“It’s always very difficult for me to find the right balance between celebrating the extraordinary reality that New Jersey is among the very best public schools systems in the country…and at the same time to talk about ways we can collectively work together to get better,” Cerf said. He called the performance reports a powerful tool to help districts “find out what’s working and how best to make improvements.”'

Star Ledger - NJ School Performance Reports for every school released today…State education officials released the School Performance Reports for all districts and schools in New Jersey …"We are providing information to enable managers, teachers, principals and superintendents to figure out what’s working [stated Education Comissioner Cerf]."...New Jersey is the first state in the nation to include arts participation in its annual report, said Robert Morrison of the New Jersey Arts Education Partnership. The data shows 47 percent of high school students are enrolled in music, dance, drama or a visual arts class...Assistant Commissioner Bari Erlichson said enrollment in visual and performing arts is “highly correlated with lots of positive student outcomes, including higher graduation rate and higher post-secondary enrollment. Our students are participating in the visual and performing arts in a significant way.”..

The Record - New Jersey releases school performance reports… Last year’s debut of the new format brought an outcry from superintendents complaining the lengthy reports contained many errors, but this year there was much less grumblingEducation Commissioner Chris Cerf praised the new reports for offering a wealth of information …“It’s always very difficult for me to find the right balance between celebrating the extraordinary reality that New Jersey is among the very best public schools systems in the country…and at the same time to talk about ways we can collectively work together to get better,” Cerf said. He called the performance reports a powerful tool to help districts “find out what’s working and how best to make improvements.”

Tuesday, January 28, 2014    Last updated: Tuesday January 28, 2014, 2:13 PM

BY  LESLIE BRODY STAFF WRITER

The New Jersey Department of Education released 2013 “Performance Reports” today for every public school statewide.

This marks the second year of a new format with categories for student growth, absenteeism, success in advanced courses, SAT scores and other measures that education officials said would give district leaders, teachers and parents more useful information than the report cards of the past – and create pressure to improve.

Last year’s debut of the new format brought an outcry from superintendents complaining the lengthy reports contained many errors, but this year there was much less grumbling. Each school is compared with about 30 “peer schools” sharing similar percentages of students who have special needs, speak limited English or are poor enough to qualify for subsidized lunch.

Some superintendents said it was confusing for parents to see their schools compared with a different set of peers this year than last year due to changes in enrollment.

“The only comment that seems to be rolling around is they’re very complicated,” said Patrick Fletcher, superintendent of River Dell Regional School District and head of the Bergen County Association of School Administrators. Due to each school’s comparison to a new set of peers, he said, “it’s going to be difficult for non-educators to make sense of it.”

Education Commissioner Chris Cerf praised the new reports for offering a wealth of information. He said in response to feedback, the reports have new data on students’ participation in the International Baccalaureate program and the ACT, a college admission test with rising popularity in New Jersey. The reports also show how many graduates of each high school enrolled in two-year and four-year colleges.

“It’s always very difficult for me to find the right balance between celebrating the extraordinary reality that New Jersey is among the very best public schools systems in the country…and at the same time to talk about ways we can collectively work together to get better,” Cerf said. He called the performance reports a powerful tool to help districts “find out what’s working and how best to make improvements.”

Email: brody@northjersey.com. on twitter @lesliebrody

 

Star Ledger - NJ School Performance Reports for every school released today…State education officials released the School Performance Reports for all districts and schools in New Jersey …"We are providing information to enable managers, teachers, principals and superintendents to figure out what’s working [stated Education Comissioner Cerf]." New Jersey is the first state in the nation to include arts participation in its annual report, said Robert Morrison of the New Jersey Arts Education Partnership. The data shows 47 percent of high school students are enrolled in music, dance, drama or a visual arts class.

By Peggy McGlone/The Star-Ledger The Star-Ledger
Email the author | Follow on Twitter  on January 28, 2014 at 1:26 PM

The state has released district-by-district snapshots of student test scores, graduation rates, absenteeism and enrollment of graduates in two-year or four-year colleges.

For the first time, student enrollment in visual and performing arts classes and advanced AP and IB courses are included in the annual School Performance Reports, released by the state Department of Education.

For the second year, state officials released the detailed analyses of individual school performance and peer group ratings rather than raw achievement numbers.

The data is intended to help educators by charting key factors for student success in college and career.

“Data plays an important part in that," Education Commissioner Chris Cerf said in advance of the release. "We are providing information to enable managers, teachers, principals and superintendents to figure out what’s working."

New Jersey is the first state in the nation to include arts participation in its annual report, said Robert Morrison of the New Jersey Arts Education Partnership. The data shows 47 percent of high school students are enrolled in music, dance, drama or a visual arts class.

“The vast majority of students entering our schools today will be employed by companies that do not exist today in industries that have yet to be invented,” he said. “To be successful they will need a wide range of educational experiences.”

Assistant Commissioner Bari Erlichson said enrollment in visual and performing arts is “highly correlated with lots of positive student outcomes, including higher graduation rate and higher post-secondary enrollment. Our students are participating in the visual and performing arts in a significant way.”

The new data also shows almost 14,000 students enrolled in AP U.S. History, making it the most popular AP course in the state. The two English AP courses were the next most popular.

About 75 percent of 116,000 students enrolled in AP and International Baccalaureate courses took the corresponding tests.

 


Garden State Coalition of Schools
160 W. State Street, Trenton New Jersey 08608
609-394-2828



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