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10-21-19 Education in the News

NJ Spotlight--Last-Minute Tweaks to Student-Testing Plan Enough to Persuade State Board Members?

Board of Education set for key vote today on the Murphy administration’s new — and revised — proposal for high school testing

 

The proposal would allow students to skip the exit test altogether to instead pursue a menu of alternative means of meeting graduation requirements.

In the lead-up to a rare special meeting of the State Board of Education today, quieter deliberations have continued over the Murphy administration’s hopes to streamline student testing in New Jersey’s high schools.

And it looks like geometry may be back in the mix for inclusion as a testing requirement.

https://www.njspotlight.com/2019/10/last-minute-tweaks-to-student-testing-plan-enough-to-persuade-state-board-members/

John Mooney | October 21, 2019 | Education

 

 

Star Ledger--N.J. is close to killing two standardized tests for 100K students. Here’s why

When your typical 10th grader enters sophomore year in New Jersey next school year, Gov. Phil Murphy wants two fewer standardized tests to be waiting for her. Sounds great for the student — and presumably for test-fatigued parents and educators, right?

https://www.nj.com/education/2019/10/nj-is-close-to-killing-two-standardized-tests-for-100k-students-heres-why.html

Adam Clark | NJ Advance Media for NJ.com| Posted Oct 20, 2019

 

 

NY Times--High Schools to TikTok: We’re Catching Feelings

Teens love the app, and now it’s getting the stamp of approval with teacher-approved clubs. Did school just get ... fun?

WINTER GARDEN, Fla. — On the wall of a classroom that is home to the West Orange High School TikTok club, large loopy words are scrawled across a whiteboard: “Wanna be TikTok famous? Join TikTok club.”

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/10/19/style/high-school-tiktok-clubs.html?rref=collection%2Fsectioncollection%2Feducation&action=click&contentCollection=education®ion=stream&module=stream_unit&version=latest&contentPlacement=1&pgtype=sectionfront

Taylor Lorenz| Published Oct. 19, 2019Updated Oct. 20, 2019

 

Education Dive--Human interaction, SEL in curriculum key to curbing cyberbullying

Focusing on interpersonal skills, even amid the perceived anonymity of the digital world, helps students learn to be more accountable in their words and interactions, experts say.

https://www.educationdive.com/news/human-interaction-sel-in-curriculum-key-to-curbing-cyberbullying/564451/

Lauren Barack| October 16, 2019

 

Edutopia--Students Think Lectures Are Best, But Research Suggests They’re Wrong

A study reveals students prefer low-effort learning strategies—like listening to lectures—despite doing better with active learning.

Students are often “poor judges” of their own learning, according to researchers in a study recently published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Strategies that require low cognitive effort—such as passively listening to a lecture—are often perceived by students to be more effective than active strategies such as hands-on experimentation and group problem-solving. The group dynamic can make students feel frustrated and “painfully aware of their lack of understanding,” but the study concluded that the more effort and struggle involved—hallmarks of a student-centered, active approach—the more students learned.

https://www.edutopia.org/article/students-think-lectures-are-best-research-suggests-theyre-wrong

Youki Terada| October 16, 2019

 

 

NPR--Key Changes Would Alter The Government's Massive Survey On Schools And Civil Rights

The Department of Education has proposed several key changes to its massive survey that collects data from the nation's public schools on a wide range of civil rights issues.

Among the changes, the 2019-2020 version of the Civil Rights Data Collection would remove questions that focus on preschool and school finance. The proposals would also add in more questions about sexual assault and bullying based on religion.

https://www.npr.org/2019/10/19/769555063/key-changes-would-alter-the-governments-massive-survey-on-schools-and-civil-righ

 Alexis Marshall| October 19, 20199:01 AM ET

 

 


Garden State Coalition of Schools
160 W. State Street, Trenton New Jersey 08608
609-394-2828