10-15-18 Education in the News

Star Ledger--The 50 N.J. school districts where teachers make the least money

 New Jersey has plenty of teachers who are making a decent living — right? 

Well, it's true that the state has some of the nation's highest-paid teachers. But it's also true that there are many teachers who are struggling to make ends meet

While the median teacher salary in New Jersey was $67,812 last school year, there were more than 100 school districts where the median salary was below $60,000 and even a few below $50,000. 

https://www.nj.com/education/2018/10/the_50_nj_school_districts_where_teachers_make_the_1.html#incart_river_index

Adam Clark | NJ Advance Media for NJ.com|  Posted October 15, 2018 at 07:00 AM | Updated October 15, 2018 at 07:22 AM

 

Philadelphia Inquirer--More local colleges are scrapping SAT requirement

Niki Mendrinos' high school guidance counselor told her she'd never get into the college of her choice, Pace University in New York.

http://www2.philly.com/philly/education/local-colleges-scrapping-sat-act-requirement-20181013.html

Susan Snyder, Updated: October 13, 2018

 

 

Press of Atlantic City--New Jersey releases transgender student policy guidelines for schools

For more than a year, Egg Harbor Township teen Emily McGrath attended meetings encouraging her local board of education to pass a policy that would protect transgender students in the district.

Now, she might finally see that happen.

Last month, the Department of Education released guidelines for school districts instructing them to the rights of transgender students including access to bathrooms and locker rooms as well as standards for pronouns and chosen names.

https://www.pressofatlanticcity.com/education/new-jersey-releases-transgender-student-policy-guidelines-for-schools/article_1a054eaf-e2fe-5edf-8211-5a7270f320dc.html

CLAIRE LOWE Staff Writer| October 14, 2018

 

Education Week--What Happens When States Un-Standardize Tests?

Few educators are fans of fill-in-the-bubble standardized tests that don’t yield results until after students leave the classroom.

But when states had a chance to try out richer forms of assessment under a new pilot program established by the Every Student Succeeds Act, all but two demurred, in part because the pilot comes with tough technical requirements and no extra federal funding.

https://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2018/10/11/what-happens-when-state-un-standardize-tests.html

Alyson Klein| October 11, 2018