2-5-19 Education in the News
NJ Spotlight--Divided Reactions to Supreme Court Ruling on PARCC and What It Means for Students Path to graduation still uncertain for about 170,000 high school seniors and juniors, but ‘business as usual’ for many school officials who continue to implement PARCC as a graduation requirement School officials, advocates, parents and legislators are divided on how the state should react to the recent state Supreme Court decision that throws out the use of PARCC testing as a graduation requirement. Because of the ruling, current New Jersey high school students have no clear guidance on what will be necessary to obtain a diploma. And it’s unclear that whatever remedy is chosen, it will be soon enough to fairly determine the future of about 170,000 current high school seniors and juniors...'

Asbury Park Press—Op-Ed: Involve Parents in LGBTQ Curriculum: Bergmann It is essential that school boards, which have the responsibility for approving the LGBT curriculum, engage community members in developing it...'

Education Week--Social-Emotional Learning Data May Identify Problems, But Can Schools Fix Them? In one district, seeing survey data about school climate and students' self-perception of social and emotional strengths motivated educators to change their practices, a new report concludes. And that was true even though the survey results weren't used for high-stakes purposes, like teacher evaluations...'

The Hechinger Report--Switching sides in the teacher wars In Rhode Island, Deborah Gist was an education reformer pushing school accountability. Then she came to Oklahoma, where the biggest challenge is getting schools the basics...'

NJ Spotlight--Divided Reactions to Supreme Court Ruling on PARCC and What It Means for Students

Path to graduation still uncertain for about 170,000 high school seniors and juniors, but ‘business as usual’ for many school officials who continue to implement PARCC as a graduation requirement

School officials, advocates, parents and legislators are divided on how the state should react to the recent state Supreme Court decision that throws out the use of PARCC testing as a graduation requirement.

Because of the ruling, current New Jersey high school students have no clear guidance on what will be necessary to obtain a diploma. And it’s unclear that whatever remedy is chosen, it will be soon enough to fairly determine the future of about 170,000 current high school seniors and juniors.

https://www.njspotlight.com/stories/19/02/04/divided-reactions-to-supreme-court-ruling-on-parcc-and-what-it-means-for-students/

Carly Sitrin | February 5, 2019

 

 

Asbury Park Press—Op-Ed: Involve Parents in LGBTQ Curriculum: Bergmann

It is essential that school boards, which have the responsibility for approving the LGBT curriculum, engage community members in developing it.

https://www.app.com/get-access/?return=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.app.com%2Fstory%2Fopinion%2Fcolumnists%2F2019%2F02%2F04%2Flgbt-curriculum-nj-history%2F2770489002%2F

Randy Bergmann|February 5, 2019

 

Education Week--Social-Emotional Learning Data May Identify Problems, But Can Schools Fix Them?

In one district, seeing survey data about school climate and students' self-perception of social and emotional strengths motivated educators to change their practices, a new report concludes. And that was true even though the survey results weren't used for high-stakes purposes, like teacher evaluations.

What's not known is whether the adjustments educators made effectively addressed the issues they were concerned about or whether they will move the needle on future survey results, says the report by Future Ed at Georgetown University.

http://blogs.edweek.org/edweek/rulesforengagement/2019/02/social-emotional_learning_data_may_identify_problems_but_can_schools_fix_them.html

 

Evie Blad on February 4, 2019 1:20 AM

 

The Hechinger Report--Switching sides in the teacher wars

In Rhode Island, Deborah Gist was an education reformer pushing school accountability. Then she came to Oklahoma, where the biggest challenge is getting schools the basics.

TULSA, Oklahoma — On a fall morning in 2018, veteran technology teacher Abraham Kamara was working with his robotics team at Memorial Junior High School when Tulsa school superintendent Deborah Gist entered the classroom with a TV news crew. Gist was there to surprise Kamara with the school year’s first Golden Apple Award, recognizing him as one of Tulsa’s “outstanding teachers.”

Amadou Diallo| February 3, 2019