Home About GSCS What's New Issues School Funding Coming Up
Quick Links
Meeting Schedule
NJ Legislature
Governor's Office
NJ Department of Education
State Board of Education
GSCS Testimonies
GSCS Data & Charts
Contact Us

Email: gscschools@gmail.com
Phone: 609-394-2828 (office)
             732-618-5755 (cell)

Mailing Address:
Garden State Coalition of Schools
Elisabeth Ginsburg, Executive Director
160 West State Street
Trenton, New Jersey 08608

Newsletters and More
Sign Up
Search
Twitter

11-10-06 NJ education chief vows urban support
GSCS FYI - Note that Commissioner points out in this article that a funding formula may not be released until "the end of the month". This underscores the semantic used in the 11-11-06 Star Ledger article below that states a funding formula "outline" will be among recommendations made in this forthcoming week re Special Session Committees. Press of Atlantic City ATLANTIC CITY — ...She added, however, that urban district spending of as much as $18,000 per student is higher than what is spent in the state's wealthiest districts...“Taxpayers want accountability,” she said. “It's important to be sure the money is invested in ways that benefit children.”

"...Davy admitted that the state has not come up with a new funding formula. A legislative committee on public school funding has been holding hearings, and Gov. Jon S. Corzine has asked that a new formula be proposed by Nov. 15. A proposal may be delayed until the end of the month..."

By DIANE D'AMICO Education Writer, (609) 272-7241
Published: Friday, November 10, 2006
ATLANTIC CITY — State Education Commissioner Lucille Davy said Thursday she is committed to making sure all children get the assistance they need to succeed, no matter where they live.
Davy told teachers at their annual convention that her school-funding goals are to maintain the state's investment in the 31 urban Abbott special needs school districts and to make additional investments to reach all at-risk children.

“We must recognize that there are other children with needs that are not being addressed,” she said at the annual New Jersey Education Association Convention.

She added, however, that urban district spending of as much as $18,000 per student is higher than what is spent in the state's wealthiest districts. She said the state also must hold the Abbott districts accountable for how the money is spent and whether academic progress is made.

“New Jersey is at the forefront in helping urban schools,” she said. “But if we are not getting outcomes, let's not ask for a bigger check. Let's instead look at how to spend the money differently.”

Davy encouraged teachers in the Abbott districts, which include Pleasantville, Vineland, Millville and Bridgeton, to speak up when they see waste or programs that don't work.
“Taxpayers want accountability,” she said. “It's important to be sure the money is invested in ways that benefit children.”

Davy admitted that the state has not come up with a new funding formula. A legislative committee on public school funding has been holding hearings, and Gov. Jon S. Corzine has asked that a new formula be proposed by Nov. 15. A proposal may be delayed until the end of the month.

“I wish I could say that I have the secret,” Davy said. “There are issues of equity and fairness.”

On Thursday, legislators released a proposal to cut property taxes that included establishing a funding formula based on need.

But educators and some legislators have said they wouldn't be surprised if a new school funding formula costs more in state aid, not less. State school funding has been virtually flat for the past five years.

Meanwhile, the state Department of Education is moving forward with initiatives from expanding preschool to targeting middle school language arts and math, and redesigning high school to have a more rigorous and personalized approach to learning.


Garden State Coalition of Schools
160 W. State Street, Trenton New Jersey 08608
609-394-2828