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2-9-18 Education in the News
NJ Spotlight--Interactive Map: Tracking the Spread of Flu Across New Jersey This year’s outbreak could match or even exceed the severity of the H1N1 pandemic of 2009 Cases of the flu continued to rise over the past week, with the total number almost double what it was at this time last year and doctors saying this year’s illness could match or even surpass the numbers infected by the H1N1 pandemic of 2009...'

Star Ledger--N.J. schools should have 'Black Lives Matter' week, says teachers union February is Black History Month in New Jersey schools, but the state's largest teachers union says schools should be teaching more than the important historical stories of Rosa Parks and Martin Luther King Jr. The New Jersey Education Association is calling for schools to participate in the national Black Lives Matter in Schools Week and teach lessons about structural racism and other race-related issues...'

Associated Press (Via Press of Atlantic City)--DC graduation scandal shows how chronic absenteeism threatens America's schools Each year in the United States, approximately 5 to 7.5 million students in the nation’s K-12 schools miss a month or more of school. That means 150 to 225 million instructional days are lost every school year. The problem is more pronounced in low-income urban communities throughout the country. In elementary school, for example, students who live in poverty were found to be as much as five times more likely to be chronically absent than their advantaged peers...'

The Atlantic--The New Tax Law’s Subtle Subversion of Public Schools The law will facilitate private-school attendance and put more obstacles in front of the neediest students. American public schools have long been, and remain, deeply unequal. At the most dilapidated and underperforming schools, teachers are blamed for stagnant graduation rates, students are derided for low tests scores, and parents are chastised for not being involved. Too often, however, scrutiny of these schools’ performance doesn’t take into account the structural factors that have contributed to their outcomes. One of the most significant factors contributing to the chasm of educational opportunity is the way that schools are funded...'

NJ Spotlight--Interactive Map: Tracking the Spread of Flu Across New Jersey

This year’s outbreak could match or even exceed the severity of the H1N1 pandemic of 2009

Cases of the flu continued to rise over the past week, with the total number almost double what it was at this time last year and doctors saying this year’s illness could match or even surpass the numbers infected by the H1N1 pandemic of 2009.

The latest report from the New Jersey Department of Health, for the week ending last Saturday, logs almost 3,100 additional cases of influenza statewide compared with the prior week, ending January 27. Since the start of the flu season on October 7, 2017, laboratories have confirmed a total of 10,418 positive tests for the virus. The actual number of cases is likely higher, as not everyone with the flu visits a doctor and not every doctor will conduct a flu test.

http://www.njspotlight.com/stories/18/02/08/interactive-map-tracking-the-spread-of-flu-across-new-jersey/

Colleen O'Dea | February 9, 2018

 

Star Ledger--N.J. schools should have 'Black Lives Matter' week, says teachers union

February is Black History Month in New Jersey schools, but the state's largest teachers union says schools should be teaching more than the important historical stories of Rosa Parks and Martin Luther King Jr. 

The New Jersey Education Association is calling for schools to participate in the national Black Lives Matter in Schools Week and teach lessons about structural racism and other race-related issues. 

Based on what other schools have done nationally, that could mean anything from Black Lives Matter art projects in elementary students to serious discussions about race in high schools. Rather than just looking back at history, schools would address issues in society today.

http://www.nj.com/education/2018/02/teachers_union_nj_schools_should_have_black_lives.html#incart_river_index

Adam Clark|Updated Feb 8, 6:42 PM; Posted Feb 8, 10:03 AM

 

Associated Press (Via Press of Atlantic City)--DC graduation scandal shows how chronic absenteeism threatens America's schools

Each year in the United States, approximately 5 to 7.5 million students in the nation’s K-12 schools miss a month or more of school. That means 150 to 225 million instructional days are lost every school year.

The problem is more pronounced in low-income urban communities throughout the country. In elementary school, for example, students who live in poverty were found to be as much as five times more likely to be chronically absent than their advantaged peers.

http://www.pressofatlanticcity.com/dc-graduation-scandal-shows-how-chronic-absenteeism-threatens-america-s/article_b037e0fa-74b8-55b4-aee6-69492d3f258d.html

Shaun M. Dougherty, University of Connecticut and Michael Gottfried, University of California, Santa Barbara

 

The Atlantic--The New Tax Law’s Subtle Subversion of Public Schools

The law will facilitate private-school attendance and put more obstacles in front of the neediest students.

American public schools have long been, and remain, deeply unequal. At the most dilapidated and underperforming schools, teachers are blamed for stagnant graduation rates, students are derided for low tests scores, and parents are chastised for not being involved. Too often, however, scrutiny of these schools’ performance doesn’t take into account the structural factors that have contributed to their outcomes. One of the most significant factors contributing to the chasm of educational opportunity is the way that schools are funded.

According to the most recent data made available by the Department of Education in 2015, the wealthiest 25 percent of school districts receive 15 percent more in per-student funding from state and local governments as compared to the poorest 25 percent of school districts. Nationally, that accounts for a $1,500-per-student funding gap, a gap that has grown by 44 percent since the 2001-02 school year. It’s a system that leaves the poor with less and the rich with more—a phenomenon that the new GOP tax law has the potential to make even worse.

https://www.theatlantic.com/education/archive/2018/02/the-new-tax-laws-subtle-subversion-of-public-schools/552356/

Clint Smith| Feb 7, 2018

 

 


Garden State Coalition of Schools
160 W. State Street, Trenton New Jersey 08608
609-394-2828