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1-2-18 Education in the News
NJ Spotlight--2018 and Counting: Drawing a Bead on Gov.-Elect Murphy’s Education Policies In some ways, Murphy campaigned as ‘not Christie,’ but now it’s time to start delivering on his education promises and programs Over the course of his eight years in office, Gov. Chris Christie grew to be pretty predictable on the issue of public education ¬— trying to revamp school funding, promoting charter schools and school choice, and whenever he could, fighting with the teachers unions...'

NJ Spotlight--Op-Ed: Jersey Politicians, Can You Hear Us Now?
Joseph Caruso    January 2, 2018
Federal tax reform makes state tax reform imperative It seems appropriate now, in the wake of the new federal tax law that New Jersey remember the immortal words of Pogo, “We have met the enemy and he is us.” The sentiment is directed at all the state politicians who are crying over the “unfairness” of the new federal tax-reform measure that caps the deduction for state and local taxes at $10,000 — including property and income taxes...'

NJ Spotlight--Op-Ed: Jersey Politicians, Can You Hear Us Now? Federal tax reform makes state tax reform imperative It seems appropriate now, in the wake of the new federal tax law that New Jersey remember the immortal words of Pogo, “We have met the enemy and he is us.” The sentiment is directed at all the state politicians who are crying over the “unfairness” of the new federal tax-reform measure that caps the deduction for state and local taxes at $10,000 — including property and income taxes...'

Star Ledger--Newark to pick own schools chief for first time in 22 years The state-appointed superintendent for Newark schools will step down in February, paving the way for the district to select its own leader for the first time in 22 years. Superintendent Christopher Cerf announced last week he would resign on Feb. 1 -- the same day the state's takeover of Newark schools will officially end...'

Princeton Packet--MERCER COUNTY: Area school districts plan teenage suicide program Seven teenage suicides in the last 20 months in Mercer County is seven suicides too many, and the 10 Mercer County public school district superintendents are determined to do something about it. The superintendents have arranged for the Traumatic Loss Coalition to present a program on teenage mental health and teenage suicides next month at Rider University in Lawrence Township...'

Washington Post-- Sharp decline in high school graduation exams is testing the education system In this new year, we are experiencing a drastic change in the way U.S. students are assessed. A national movement led by educators, parents and legislators has greatly cut back high-stakes standardized testing in public schools...'

NJ Spotlight--2018 and Counting: Drawing a Bead on Gov.-Elect Murphy’s Education Policies

In some ways, Murphy campaigned as ‘not Christie,’ but now it’s time to start delivering on his education promises and programs

Over the course of his eight years in office, Gov. Chris Christie grew to be pretty predictable on the issue of public education ¬— trying to revamp school funding, promoting charter schools and school choice, and whenever he could, fighting with the teachers unions.

At the start of his State House stay, Gov.-elect Phil Murphy is not as easy to read in terms of what lies ahead for New Jersey schools — at least not yet.

http://www.njspotlight.com/stories/18/01/01/2018-and-counting-drawing-a-bead-on-gov-elect-murphy-s-education-policies/

John Mooney | January 2, 2018

 

NJ Spotlight--Op-Ed: Jersey Politicians, Can You Hear Us Now?

Federal tax reform makes state tax reform imperative

It seems appropriate now, in the wake of the new federal tax law that New Jersey remember the immortal words of Pogo, “We have met the enemy and he is us.”

The sentiment is directed at all the state politicians who are crying over the “unfairness” of the new federal tax-reform measure that caps the deduction for state and local taxes at $10,000 — including property and income taxes.

Many of the same people blasting Congress are the same members of the state Legislature, as well as county and local governments, who made New Jersey the highest-taxed state in the land. Now that Congress has reduced our ability to write off those taxes — as if they didn't exist — the politicians may finally get the message: It's time to lower property taxes — especially on middle-class families — or face expulsion from public office.

http://www.njspotlight.com/stories/18/01/01/op-ed-jersey-politicians-can-you-hear-us-now/

Joseph Caruso | January 2, 2018

 

NJ Spotlight--Op-Ed: Jersey Politicians, Can You Hear Us Now?

Federal tax reform makes state tax reform imperative

It seems appropriate now, in the wake of the new federal tax law that New Jersey remember the immortal words of Pogo, “We have met the enemy and he is us.”

The sentiment is directed at all the state politicians who are crying over the “unfairness” of the new federal tax-reform measure that caps the deduction for state and local taxes at $10,000 — including property and income taxes.

Many of the same people blasting Congress are the same members of the state Legislature, as well as county and local governments, who made New Jersey the highest-taxed state in the land. Now that Congress has reduced our ability to write off those taxes — as if they didn't exist — the politicians may finally get the message: It's time to lower property taxes — especially on middle-class families — or face expulsion from public office.

http://www.njspotlight.com/stories/18/01/01/op-ed-jersey-politicians-can-you-hear-us-now/

Joseph Caruso | January 2, 2018

 

Star Ledger--Newark to pick own schools chief for first time in 22 years

The state-appointed superintendent for Newark schools will step down in February, paving the way for the district to select its own leader for the first time in 22 years. 

Superintendent Christopher Cerf announced last week he would resign on Feb. 1 -- the same day the state's takeover of Newark schools will officially end.

http://www.nj.com/essex/index.ssf/2017/12/newark_to_pick_own_schools_chief_for_first_time_in_22_years.html#incart_river_index

Karen Yi| Updated Dec 26; Posted Dec 26

 

Princeton Packet--MERCER COUNTY: Area school districts plan teenage suicide program

Seven teenage suicides in the last 20 months in Mercer County is seven suicides too many, and the 10 Mercer County public school district superintendents are determined to do something about it.

The superintendents have arranged for the Traumatic Loss Coalition to present a program on teenage mental health and teenage suicides next month at Rider University in Lawrence Township.

The event is set for Jan. 9 at 7 p.m. in the Cavalla Room at the Bart Luedeke Student Center at Rider. The Traumatic Loss Coalition at Rutgers- University Behavioral Health Care is the state's primary youth suicide prevention program.

The superintendents outlined their concerns about teen suicide and mental health issues - and the need to take action - in a letter signed by each of the chief school officers.

http://www.centraljersey.com/news/mercer-county-area-school-districts-plan-teenage-suicide-program/article_ff919d92-ec09-11e7-893a-d775210e6d70.html

Lea Kahn, Staff Writer| Dec 28, 2017 Updated Dec 28, 2017

 

Washington Post-- Sharp decline in high school graduation exams is testing the education system

In this new year, we are experiencing a drastic change in the way U.S. students are assessed. A national movement led by educators, parents and legislators has greatly cut back high-stakes standardized testing in public schools.

Five years ago, 25 states had standardized high school exit exams whose results affected graduation. Now, only 13 states are doing that. A report by the nonprofit FairTest: The National Center for Fair & Open Testing has revealed this shift and chronicled efforts to reduce many other kinds of testing.

It’s a breathtaking turnabout, but without much celebrating. National dissatisfaction with our schools hasn’t changed much. It is at 52 percent, according to the Gallup Poll, about where it was in 2012 when 25 states had exit tests. That may have something to do with another development even more important to our schools’ futures.

In December, the Collaborative for Student Success, in partnership with Bellwether Education Partners, reported on state efforts to install creative programs to boost achievement, as encouraged by the new federal Every Student Succeeds Act.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/education/sharp-decline-in-high-school-graduation-exams-is-testing-the-education-system/2017/12/31/662dc31c-eb5d-11e7-9f92-10a2203f6c8d_story.html?utm_term=.fa93dc2ef570

Jay Mathews Columnist December 31, 2017

 


Garden State Coalition of Schools
160 W. State Street, Trenton New Jersey 08608
609-394-2828